Capitol Beat: New Water Bills with One Month to Go

By Larry Morandi As the Colorado General Assembly nears its three-quarters post (adjournment is set for May 9), two new water bills have been introduced and heard in committee. The more contentious is House Bill 18-1301, which addresses water quality impacts of mineral mining. It would require reclamation plans for new or amended hard rock … Continue reading Capitol Beat: New Water Bills with One Month to Go

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Capitol Beat: Water Bills Advance as Legislature Reaches Half-Way Point

By Larry Morandi As the Colorado General Assembly reaches the mid-point of its 2018 session, here’s a sample of water bills that have passed the house and are in the senate for consideration. They address aquatic nuisance species, use of reclaimed domestic wastewater, deficit irrigation and alternative transfer mechanisms, and groundwater storage and recovery. Final … Continue reading Capitol Beat: Water Bills Advance as Legislature Reaches Half-Way Point

Capitol Beat: Legislature Considers Alternatives to Buy and Dry

By Larry Morandi The Colorado General Assembly is considering a bill that would explore “deficit irrigation” as an alternative transfer mechanism (ATM). ATMs look at alternatives to the acquisition of agricultural water rights and their permanent transfer to other uses. Deficit irrigation is a strategy that applies less water than necessary to meet a crop’s … Continue reading Capitol Beat: Legislature Considers Alternatives to Buy and Dry

Aquatic Nuisance Species

Aquatic nuisance species (ANS), plants and animals that invade lakes, reservoirs, rivers and streams, pose an increasing threat to Colorado’s water resources. The major threat is from zebra and quagga mussels invading water bodies across the state. Other nuisance species include New Zealand mudsnails and rusty crayfish. Colorado Parks and Wildlife has an inspection protocol … Continue reading Aquatic Nuisance Species

Change Brings Hope

By the Colorado Water Trust staff In October 2016, The Durango Herald carried a modest story sporting the headline, “Trout Discovered in Creek Long Devoid of Fish.”  In the southwest corner of Colorado, where abandoned mines and contaminated streams have long been a part of the otherwise magnificent mountain landscape, this is encouraging news—especially for a … Continue reading Change Brings Hope

Opinion: Bill Promotes Opportunities for Implementing More Aquifer Recharge and Recovery Projects in Colorado

By Ralf Topper HB 17-1076 is currently making its way through the legislative process having passed the House and the Senate.  This legislation, concerning rulemaking for artificial recharge of nontributary aquifers, opens the door for opportunities to implement aquifer storage and recovery programs in nontributary aquifers outside of the Denver Basin.  Nontributary groundwater, as defined … Continue reading Opinion: Bill Promotes Opportunities for Implementing More Aquifer Recharge and Recovery Projects in Colorado

Rainbarrels and Rainwater Harvesting for Water Conservation and Stormwater Management

Last month, Governor Hickenlooper signed HB 16-1005 into law, making rainwater harvesting widely legal in Colorado. Thanks to the legislation, precipitation can now be collected from residential rooftops, provided a maximum of two barrels with a combined storage of 110 gallons or less are used; precipitation is collected from a single-family residence or building that … Continue reading Rainbarrels and Rainwater Harvesting for Water Conservation and Stormwater Management

CFWE remembers the legacy of founder Diane Hoppe

Colorado Representative Diane Hoppe passed away Saturday.   "A great leader for challenging times. Graceful in times of stress. Generous with her wisdom at all times.  Her enduring legacy, leadership by example," says Justice Greg Hobbs, vice president of the CFWE board. Diane helped found the Colorado Foundation for Water Education, served as board president from … Continue reading CFWE remembers the legacy of founder Diane Hoppe

EPA’s new WOTUS rule expected soon, amid pushback

By Mark Scharfenaker Wherefloweth the Clean Water Act Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule jointly proposed last spring by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers? The rule clarifies which waters are covered under the Clean Water Act, raising concerns over a potentially expanded federal jurisdiction over previously uncovered waterways, wetlands, and groundwater resources. … Continue reading EPA’s new WOTUS rule expected soon, amid pushback

Catching Colorado’s Rainwater

It's one of the most common questions and concerns we hear from Coloradans interested in water "Why can't we capture rainwater? Aren't rain barrels illegal in Colorado?" (the barrels themselves are legal, and widely sold, it's the rainwater storage that isn't in most cases)... But that could change. On Monday, Colorado's House of Representatives voted in … Continue reading Catching Colorado’s Rainwater